McCaskill Criticizes Stoops On DGB Decision

Image of Claire McCaskill

It’s probably time to pay attention when a United States senator goes out of her way to castigate a prominent university football coach while urging real leaders in “big-time sports” to “do a soul search on character.”

That coach is Bob Stoops, head of the University of Oklahoma Sooners, and the senator is Missouri’s Claire McCaskill, a Democrat and a former sex crimes prosecutor, who wrote recently about how surprised she was that Stoops had been selected by some Division I coaches as someone they would want their “sons” to play for.

The reason she was stunned, according to her widely circulated article in USA Today, was because Stoops had welcomed to his football program University of Missouri transfer Dorial Green-Beckham, nicknamed DGB. DGB was kicked off the Missouri Tigers football team after he allegedly pushed a woman down some stairs, McCaskill points out. No charges were filed in the case because the woman, according to McCaskill’s article, didn’t cooperate with police or prosecutors.

OU petitioned the NCAA to rule DGB eligible this year on grounds that seem to intentionally ignore the gory details of the case, but it was denied, and it’s unclear whether he will ever play for the Sooners or any college football program again.

In her article, McCaskill asks rhetorically, “But for Stoops to get the most votes from his fellow coaches as the coach they wanted to influence their sons?” She goes on to argue:

Unfortunately, that says it all. It is time for real leaders in the world of big-time sports to do a soul search on character. Every decision they make reflects on them in ways that a won/loss record never will.

McCaskill didn’t but could have also mentioned how Stoops has handled the case of 18-year-old Joe Mixon, an OU player who was caught on videotape July 25 hitting a woman in the face and fracturing her jaw. Mixon was charged with the misdemeanor crime of “an act resulting in a gross injury” and the university, with Stoops’ apparent agreement, suspended him for only one year from the team. Mixon has since been seen hanging out with the team. Remember, Mixon’s violence was caught on a tape that was viewed by media members, and he and his attorney have not disputed the video evidence.

All this comes at a time when NFL players like Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson have been kicked off their teams for violent actions. Rice was kicked off the Baltimore Ravens after a new tape surfaced showing him knocking out his fiancé with a violent fist jab. Peterson, a former OU player coached by none other than Bob Stoops, was kicked off the Minnesota Vikings after it was learned he whipped his 4-year-old son with a tree switch, leaving behind cuts and bruising.

“Got him in the nuts once I noticed,” Peterson apparently texted the boy’s mother, according to one article. Isn’t that sexual abuse as well? What if Peterson had struck a 4-year-old girl on her genitalia? Wouldn’t he be charged with a sex crime? Nonetheless, Peterson has been charged with “reckless or negligent injury to a child” in Texas where the beating occurred.

Those people who try to defend people like Stoops, Mixon and Peterson forget that coaches and star athletes on major college and professional teams serve as role models, a standard trope that is promoted through, among other things, jersey sales, television appearances and commercial endorsements. The media is culpable as well by creating a worship culture around star athletes. They make their money, too. Everyone gets their cut, except the victims of violence.

McCaskill does us all a great service for bringing out into the open and arguing against the violent behavior permeating what she calls big-time sports. It’s a sick culture—and that includes many sports fans—that tolerates this violence or dismisses it with a shrug or doesn’t remove the offenders from their pedestals.